For the second bite, I peer down into the crevice I’ve created and find mostly more sauce there lurking at the edges. By squeezing the triangle at the center I’m able to force more of the granular gray beef out of the darkness, along with a bit of reddish gunk that I imagine is supposed to be peppers or something. I make sure to get a bunch of these elements into my mouth along with the sauce, and am immediately overcome with regret. A full bite of the nacho doesn’t resemble anything close to an actual nacho, or even a burrito, it is really just a jackhammer-like barrage of highs and lows: the sharp chemical tang of what is supposed to be considered festive gives way to the more prevalent, flat pull of the mass of softness that has no particular definition in my mind beyond a thing inside my mouth.

What Is This Terror Before Me: A Review of the New Taco Bell Grilled Stuft Nacho

Source Vice Magazine


"[There are] too many choices possible, but here is one epoch-making trend: as the post-2008 rise of hydraulic fracturing drove U.S. natural gas prices down and increased the supply (in 2013 the U.S. will be again the world’s largest natural gas producer) oil and gas prices, traditionally moving in tandem, have diverged significantly. History is being made." -Vaclav Smil

"[There are] too many choices possible, but here is one epoch-making trend: as the post-2008 rise of hydraulic fracturing drove U.S. natural gas prices down and increased the supply (in 2013 the U.S. will be again the world’s largest natural gas producer) oil and gas prices, traditionally moving in tandem, have diverged significantly. History is being made." -Vaclav Smil

Source Washington Post